Occupy Berlin: We Are the 99%

by Christy on

As you’re probably already aware, last month a series of demonstrations began in New York City.

Dubbed “Occupy Wall Street”, the protests criticize the absence of legal repercussions following the recent global financial crisis and the excessive influence of big business on U.S. laws and policies.

We Are the 99%, Occupy Wall Street Berlin

Their rallying cry has become “We are the 99%” — meaning the 99% of Americans who are having their homes foreclosed on, who are facing debilitating student loan debt, and who can’t afford medical care or insurance coverage… while the remaining 1% grow ever wealthier.

The Occupy Wall Street protests have spread from NYC to every state in the U.S., and this weekend similar events were organized around the world in solidarity.

I mention all this in a travel blog because yesterday we attended the (mostly) peaceful protest in Berlin, where we joined 10,000 other protesters in marching from Alexanderplatz to Bundestag, the German House of Parliament.

Occupy Berlin, Occupy Wall Street Protests

We were surprised by how broad a swath of “the 99%” was represented — this definitely wasn’t just a protest for punk teenagers sporting chains and mohawks.

Along with hippies singing folk songs and the ever-present hipsters there were also tons of kids, dogs, families, and elderly couples walking hand-in-hand.

Occupy Berlin Wall Street

Occupy Wall Street Berlin Occupy Wall Street Berlin

The majority of the march was surprisingly tranquil, but the energy level shot up at the end as, with drums beating and flags flying, the front of the crowd raced across the park toward the steps of the Bundestag.

Occupy Wall Street solidarity protest in Berlin

We found ourselves in the front of the crowd as it reached the police line protecting the building and were steps away when, in a sudden frenzy of conflict, a handful of protesters yanked down the metal barricades and drug them back into the crowd.

One minute I was laughing with Kali about a particularly well-worded sign, and the next we were caught in a fleeing crowd trying to escape riot police pepper spray.

Shit just got real.

Since we had no desire to be arrested in a country where we didn’t speak the language, and nor did we relish the thought of being trampled or maced in the face, we decided to get the hell off the front line.

We took shelter in a little nook on the side where, semi-protected by construction fencing, we watched this particular cop repeatedly push protestors back when they crossed an arbitrary (in the sense that he seemed to keep changing his mind about where exactly it lay) line.

Police at the Occupy Berlin Protest

After a tense period things finally calmed down, and eventually a huge section of the crowd sat on the ground while others gathered around them in a circle.

This guy started speaking, and after each sentence the crowd would repeat back his words so everyone could hear the message. We later learned that this technique is called “the human microphone” and is employed by protestors to allow everyone in a crowd to hear the speaker’s words when sound systems are prohibited.

Occupy Wall Street Berlin Protest

After some rousing initial remarks that drew a great deal of laughter from the crowd, we found someone to translate for us just as the speaker got down to the practicalities of organizing an outdoor protest in the not-exactly-balmy Berlin weather.

Having (from what we could tell) only recently made the decision to occupy the park for as long as they could, and fearing that if they left the space now they wouldn’t be allowed back later, organizers were encouraging folks to call their friends and request blankets, tents, and similar supplies.

Occupy Wall Street Berlin Protest

When the group seemed settled in for the long haul, we wandered further back in the park to find hundreds more protestors playing bongos, sharing food, starting chants, and generally enjoying the atmosphere of solidarity.

Groups of police decked out in riot gear would periodically wander through, but we didn’t see any other skirmishes and, aside from the somewhat-belligerent pusher we photographed early on, the majority of police seemed peacefully minded.

Police at Occupy Berlin Protest

I’ve always been fascinated by riot police, and while watching one of their patrol groups shift to continually protect their backs in the crowd I was struck by the difficult position they must find themselves in.

It seems safe to presume that every one of those police officers is part of the 99%. Some of them might identify with the protests, relate to the movement, and believe that change needs to happen, but they’ve also been tasked with preventing the demonstration from getting out of hand.

Occupy Berlin, Occupy Wall Street

Police brutality, when it occurs, is a devastating abuse of the public trust (and unfortunately it has been a well-documented occurance throughout the Occupy Wall Street protests in the U.S.).

Protesters and police officers aren’t necessarily natural enemies, however, and there’s complexity to every issue. I wonder how many of these public officers wanted to be on the other side of the barricade, perhaps joining their friends and families?

Or perhaps I’m just a bleeding-heart liberal who assumes everyone wants to see real change occur.

What do you think?


RESOURCES

{ 62 comments… read them below or add one }

Caanan @ No Vacation Requiredtwitter: NVRguys October 16, 2011 at

We attended the Occupy Seattle rally and march yesterday. It was invigorating to see such a diverse range of people joining together to stand up against corporate greed.

It’s great to see that the movement is spreading around the world. This is not a US problem, it’s a global problem that effects all of us.

99% > 1%
Caanan @ No Vacation Required recently posted: Table for 9 Billion Please

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

I think it’s so great that these protests have developed all over the world – you’re right that it’s absolutely a global issue, and it’s inspiring to see so many people from so many countries demanding change.

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Stevetwitter: vangrizz October 16, 2011 at

I’m surprised to see so many English signs. Is that normal for Berlin or is it just more of a nod to the American roots of the protest?
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Christy October 17, 2011 at

There were definitely a lot more signs in German than English – it’s just that we took more photos of the English ones because that’s what we could understand. But I was kind of surprised that there were a number of signs in English as well. I think you’re right that it was sort of a nod to the American roots, and we do see a lot of billboards and random signs written in English around here. I just don’t know!

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vesna October 17, 2011 at

This is global for sure. We were in Frankfurt, Berlin and Leipzig a few months back. We are currently in Serbia and Beograd, Novi Sad and Kragujevac started this weekend, although the turn outs are rather disappointing. I have hope they will grow. It’s good to see Berlin (and Leipzig!) growing :) As for English – it’s everywhere here in Europe…Tshirts, graffiti, etc. A lot of people speak it because it is taught from first grade. When I was in Leipzig however, it was rare to come across anyone speaking English or anything like that. But once we got to Berlin, it was everywhere (and very much a tourist hub) and a lot of people spoke. I have such hopes for this movement. :) I had hopes for the Boomers as well until the sell out, but somehow I think this is different because it is global and we have seen the repercussions of the glory days.

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

Thank you so much for adding your insight, Vesna. I have high hopes for the movement, too. One month in and it’s only gaining momentum….

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robin October 19, 2011 at

I’m sure it was done with international media coverage (such as yourselves) in mind.

Down here on the Straits we aren’t near a protest but we applaud them and the movement.
robin recently posted: Las Nubes

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Ruth October 16, 2011 at

It’s funny that one officer is determined to push back while the line of police stands and watches.

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

Seriously! No one else seemed too concerned, but that guy was so aggressive. I could kind of understand if the protestors were really hostile and trying to rush past (which, granted, some had been doing 10 minutes earlier), but the ones getting pushed by this guy were just unaware that they had taken one step too far forward. And everyone who got pushed just gave him a bland look and walked away.

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John D. Wilson October 17, 2011 at

Personally, I took the “Atlas Shrugged” route and I’m just not participating anymore.
I buy very few things new, I will pay no taxes this year, and will change my bank account when I can figure out how to do it. (I am outside the USA, so kind of difficult)
Why anyone banks at the major banks – Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citibank) is beyond me – they are crooks, plain and simple.
Why anyone shops at Wal-Mart is beyond me – they do everything they can, even selling at a loss, to drive their competition into bankruptcy. Pay their employees low wages.
When looking at the world – it is all a matter of choices – as the people who participate in OCW on iPhones and computers built in China for 100′s of $’s and sold in the states for triple of more profit. How can one fight for equality and shop at the stores that they object too?
Interesting times. Interesting choices of everyone involved.
Cheers,
John D. Wilson
John D. Wilson recently posted: Want to stick it to the man? Drop out and take a permanent holiday!

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Christy @ Ordinary Traveler October 17, 2011 at

I have to agree with John. The people need to make decisions not to give money to these places before we will start to see a change.
Christy @ Ordinary Traveler recently posted: Should You Rent Camping/Backpacking Gear for a Trip?

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

I agree, John, and I think it’s a complicated issue. I’m not of the mindset that we need to completely dismantle capitalism, but the fact that our government is (in effect) run by corporations is deeply problematic. I’m an advocate of mindful consumption on a personal level (so yes, I absolutely think it’s important to think carefully about where and how things are made), but it goes beyond the individual.

This is an institutional problem, and until institutional changes are made we’re going to find ourselves with the same issues, regardless of what kind of phones we buy (or don’t).

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Andrea October 17, 2011 at

I’ve been watching these protests with interest. Photo essays with the sign messages are really great for capturing the many interconnecting issues that people are demonstrating against. Thanks for sharing these – sounds like quite an experience!
Andrea recently posted: 5 Reasons to Love Switzerland Even Though it’s so Damn Expensive!

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

There are so many fantastic signs being used at the demonstrations to convey what people are fighting for (or fighting against). They really are a great snapshot into the movement. :)

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Christy @ Ordinary Traveler October 17, 2011 at

I’m amazed at how widespread this is. We saw a group of protesters in our small town this weekend as well. It’s interesting to think about the tough decision the police must be in. I wonder too how they feel about things. I wonder though, what will come of these protests?

It seems there are many things the people are protesting about to the point that it’s almost confusing for someone on the outside. One thing I do have to say for this group is that it’s really good to see people standing up for themselves for a change. I wouldn’t mind joining one of these groups as long as it continues to be peaceful.

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

That’s been a big criticism of the protests, Christy (that there are so many demands and no cohesive message), but I think mostly the two complaints are the bail-outs of the financial institutions (using tax dollars and with no repercussions for the ones who screwed up) and the fact that big business has such a strong influence on our government, so their interests seem to take priority over everything else. And like a billion other things, lol, but those are two biggies.

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inkatwitter: lilygogo October 17, 2011 at

Holy cow, you were certainly in the thick of things. i’m not surprised that my americanized countrymen, especially those in Berlin, caught on fast and with signs in English too.
inka recently posted: Orient Express Museum – a tiny piece of nostalgia in Istanbul

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

Yeah, the English signs were sort of surprising… but I have to admit I appreciated being able to read some of them. :)

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Artitwitter: artisdiary October 17, 2011 at

Really, this must have been quite an adventure…
You seem to be in the thick of this, its really good to keep out of all this in a new country (even in your own, most times!!).
Have a fabulous week ahead:)
Arti recently posted: My Tryst with the Evening Ganga Arti at the Har Ki Pauri Ghat in Haridwar

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

These protests can get dicey, so I’m more than happy to keep out of the worst of it!

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Cole @ Four Jandalstwitter: fourjandals October 17, 2011 at

I don’t necessarily agree with the part about the police brutality. Sure they do get out of hand very rarely but usually it is in retaliation to what someone else has done (i.e. throw a bottle or in this instance remove the barricades ). But they can go too far sometimes so hear what you are saying. I do like the fact that in general everyone is protesting as worldwide for a worthy cause and its great to see the majority is peaceful. Hopefully 1% of the 99% don’t ruin it for everyone else!
John D Wilson also hit it on the head, don’t just protest but stop buying/shopping/using those corporations. I no longer use BP due to the oil spill. Will even drive further than I have to because I don’t agree with what they do. But thats just one guy trying to make a difference. Everyone needs to. Thanks.
Cole @ Four Jandals recently posted: Ice Climbing in the UK

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

Thanks for the comment, Cole. Unfortunately there is (and has been) a lot of police brutality documented; it’s one thing for police to defend themselves if they’re being attacked, but the problem is that excessive force is being used against protestors who pose no threat.

People have been maced directly in the face and beaten with batons, and the videos clearly show that the police aren’t being attacked as this happens.
Here are some links with videos and more info:
http://www.observer.com/2011/09/occupy-wall-street-update-alleged-police-brutality-caught-on-film-video/
http://boingboing.net/2011/09/25/videos-show-police-brutality-at-occupy-wall-street-protests.html
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/05/occupy-wall-street-nypd-police-brutality-video_n_997414.html

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Laureltwitter: ExpatGermany October 17, 2011 at

It sounds like you’ve had quite the experience. I’m not surprised that this is happening in the U.S., but I am surprised that it’s happening in Germany, where there is health care and better social support for everyone, regardless of their income, than in the U.S.
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Christy October 17, 2011 at

That’s a really interesting point, Laurel! I wish I could speak German and talk with people here to see if they’re protesting more in solidarity with the U.S. or in response to social and political issues more specific to Germany. But I a lot of the issues really are global problems — extreme wealth disparity is an issue in most countries.

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Sophietwitter: SophieR October 17, 2011 at

There were protests in almost 1000 cities in 80 countries, so no doubt this is a global issue. (Although I shouldn’t be surprised if a few of those protesters were there to demonstrate over Germany having to bail out everyone else, too).
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Christy October 17, 2011 at

Wow, 80 countries? I find it funny that some people have categorized the Occupy Wall Street protests as the leftist version of the Tea Party. I think if that were the case, you wouldn’t see similar protests in 80 different countries, y’know?

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Stephanietwitter: Findthefreeway October 17, 2011 at

Amazing pictures….the equivalent of shots seen in magazines. Thank you for sharing such awesome stories and images with us! As soon as I finish one of your posts, I am eager to read the next adventure! Congrats for extending your dreams outside of the US and into the rest of the world!
Stephanie recently posted: Exploring Pinless States: Arkansas

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Christy October 17, 2011 at

Your compliments just made my day, Stephanie! Thank you so much! :)

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Jeremy Branhamtwitter: budgettravelsac October 17, 2011 at

Honestly, I am not in the 99% or 1% so not sure where I fit in. I don’t have debt, not being foreclosed upon, have insurance, but don’t see my wealth growing! I am a one income family with two kids living in California – I do enough to by each month.

As for the protests, had no idea they were becoming this big. Saw where these were going on in Sacramento this weekend. I understand people being upset about greed but a lot needs to be done about the incompetence of politicians in Washington as well.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

I was interested in what it takes to be considered part of the 1%, so I did some internet research and found these links:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/205088.html
http://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2011/10/12/occupy-wall-street-who-are-the-1/

Apparently, the top 1% is made up of millionaires who own the majority share of the nation’s stock/mutual funds, securities, and business equity. It’s possible to be wealthy (with investments and no debt) but still not be in that top tier. The 1% look to be the Fortune 500 CEOs, for instance….. and, apparently, a lot of Congress (according to that first link).

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jill- Jack and Jill Travel The Worldtwitter: jacknjilltravel October 17, 2011 at

Been following these movements back home pretty closely – the situation is frustrating between the greedy corps and the greedy politicians. Sometimes I get so angry reading the news that Jack would take the laptop away from me. If there were any of these protests nearby we would be right there. Probably carrying one of those “I’m so angry I made a sign” signs.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

I know! I’ve been so angry about these issues for so long, it’s nice to finally see something being done about it. Who knows what kind of lasting effects the protests will have, but at least now people are talking about the issues, y’know? And I’d totally carry that sign.

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Shirlene from Idelishtwitter: idelishTravel October 17, 2011 at

How intense! I’ve honestly never been one to join in on protests. Maybe because I don’t know where I fit in most of the time. I’m somewhere in between the 99% and the 1%! I too also wonder sometimes how the uniformed men and women feel when they are always forced to be on the other side of the protest because it’s their job?
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Sailortwitter: CruisePictures October 17, 2011 at

Very interesting pictures. I hope the movement will finally spread to the whole world and get some positive results.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

Thanks, Sailor, and me too. :)

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Natalietwitter: turkishtravel October 17, 2011 at

John has a point. Change is needed but we should start with our own practises first
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Melissatwitter: longhaulproject October 17, 2011 at

Occupy Boston is taking place right around the corner from where I live, so I’m getting used to passing the protesters each day as I walk the dog and been interested to see how their numbers have grown and how city and police officials have dealt with them ( a mostly hands-off and laid back approach, except when protesters tried to expand their camp to a recently landscaped area with thousands of dollars worth of new plants- then they started making arrests… “occupy all you want, just don’t damage the plants…?”)

I had no idea the protests had spread so far and wide, so very interested to see your account from Berlin. What I’m finding the most challenging is coming to an understanding of exactly what protesters want and hope to achieve, which makes it hard to completely understand how much I support the movement. But overall, the upsurge in this activity indicates to me that there’s a massive level of frustration with current economic and political systems around the world and I wonder how much bigger this movement will grow… and what will happen next. I hope it doesn’t spill into the realm of riots, police brutality and arrests.

As always, thanks for sharing your stories from the road.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

“Occupy all you want, just don’t damage the plants…?”

LOL. I’d be pretty pissed if my new plants were damaged, too, so I can see that. :) I hear what you’re saying about the difficulties in understanding what exactly the protestors are protesting, though…. and I definitely know that I don’t agree with some of it. I don’t think anarchy is the right approach (though that’s not to say that a majority of protestors do, either) and I’m sure there are a ton of disparate ideas on how exactly things should change.

It’s hard to know where the movement will lead, but I think part of its success is the fact that they haven’t centered on just one issue. I guess the overarching focus is on the climate of greed and corruption… but that’s not exactly easy to fix!

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roman October 18, 2011 at

Hey, been following your blog for a couple of weeks now. Thanks for sharing your experience from Occupy Berlin. Great photo coverage. Its amazing to know that the movement spread to cities all over the world, it gives a lot more credence to the message, beyond how the media has tried to cover it as just a liberal left movement. Its obvious that it resonates across politics and national boundaries. We stopped by the Occupy Denver when we passed through Colorado, and even though they were facing eviction from the tent city, it was still going strong. Hope to attend a similar march in a city on the west coast somewhere. As far as the police behavior, i think that its usually a result of good or bad prep and training, and directives from the police command. If the officers are not prepared, or instructed on how to react, individuals will over-react with violence when under threat. Hopefully the police leadership will seek to contain any violent responses.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

That’s really great insight about police response, Roman. As an officer facing a dicey protest, if you don’t know what you’re supposed to be doing it could become very easy to react harshly if something unexpected arises. And you never know when a protest might turn into a riot (the recent riots in London are a good example)!

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Heath Ross October 18, 2011 at

What got my interests is how they use humans as a megaphone. It’s a great way to get attention but it would be good if someone actually listened to what they (the protesters) want or what their problems are.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

That would definitely be a good start. :)

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Annie - FootTracker October 18, 2011 at

I see this activity is spreading to world wide now, not just USA anymore. While I understand the frustration of the public and do believe that something needs to be change to help the middle class more, I am more afraid to join protest as a tourist because of safety issues.

It happened before in Asia that tourists got arrested for protesting in another Asian country, and got deported right away because their visa is a tourist visa, not a visa to participate in local, political, or business related activities. After hearing news like that, I am more careful about what I do in other countries. (Really depends on the country’s culture and legal rights)
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

I think you’re completely right to avoid protests in other countries, Annie, and we (mostly) try to do the same. You just never know what’s going to happen or what kind of response there will be. We didn’t even think about the possibility of being deported (probably less likely in the E.U., but maybe still a possibility?), but I really don’t want to know what it’s like to get arrested in Germany. Being arrested in the U.S. for that kind of thing sounds stressful enough! And here we wouldn’t know who to call to bail us out, lol.

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Akilatwitter: theroadforks October 18, 2011 at

Fantastic pictures, guys, as always, and such an interesting view of what’s currently going on in the world. We’re in Italy now and the protests in Rome are real – but in Tuscany, we don’t feel them at all. Really, really interesting that they were planning on hunkering down and waiting until things changed (also, is it normal that most of the signs were in English?) Or did you just happen to take only pictures in English.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

I read about the protest in Rome – it was one of the most intense, and I believe some cars were set on fire. I think the destruction was mostly by a small group of protestors in vigilante outfits, but I’m not sure…. who knows what’s actually accurate on the internet. :)

I think the English signs were partly a nod to the roots of the protests, helpful for international media coverage, and an illustration of just how common English is in Berlin!

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Debbie Beardsley @ European Travelistatwitter: eurotravelista October 18, 2011 at

Guess I’m in the same boat as Jeremy! My assets are safe but I have been watching my 401K go down with the market! I just wish people wouldn’t focus totally on the banks. They are in the mess because of the rules politicians put in place many years ago. Need to go back and clean house!
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

It’s hard to distinguish between “big business” and politicians, because so many politicians are absurdly wealthy millionaires with corporate ties! I agree that we need to “clean house” and create new governmental rules and regulations. Our current political situation is clearly not working for the majority of the population.

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Adrian B.twitter: traveltosun October 18, 2011 at

I totally agree with what John D. Wilson said earlier.
In fact, I’m not sure about the effect of these street protests, even though there are more and more cities around the world participating.
I think a better (and peaceful) way to let the 1 % know that the rest of 99 % is suffering is to reduce the demand of products with unjustified high prices: the lower the demand, the lower the prices. Eventually, this simple rule of capitalism will solve the things, smoothly than a street protest.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

Hi Adrian, thanks for the comment! I think that’s a great way to “protest with our wallets”… however, I’m not convinced that’s going to address the full scope of the problem.

For example, the relatively recent Supreme Court ruling on “corporate personhood” will have (and has had) a lasting effect on our democracy and the role that corporations play. Under this ruling corporations are given free speech (like individuals) and as such they can donate massive amounts of money to political candidates. This of course makes politicians even more indebted to corporations, which impacts the way they vote, how they draft bills and what gets introduced, what agencies get funded and what regulations get enforced, etc. etc.

When politicians are beholden to corporations (because that’s who funded their campaign), then they are much more likely to spend their political careers working for corporations’ interests rather than the general public.

I can definitely protest with my wallet – and I do! – but I personally believe that technique alone isn’t going to change the institutional roots (and this is just one example).

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Stephanie - The Travel Chicatwitter: thetravelchica October 18, 2011 at

Interesting to see your perspective on a protest like this in a foreign country. Never heard of the human microphone technique, but that’s pretty cool.
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Christy October 19, 2011 at

Thanks, Stephanie – it was the first time I had seen it before, and I was impressed by how well it seemed to work.

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Eriktwitter: eriksmithdotcom October 19, 2011 at

I have to confess, I am usually up on world news, but pressing work commitments have kept me busy so I haven’t been following this. Thanks for getting me caught up and giving it some perspective.
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Christy October 21, 2011 at

I definitely understand, Eric — sometimes it’s so hard staying on top of current events. I don’t really have time to stay on top of news channels, so I only check in every couple of days. Blogs and Twitter fill in the rest.

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Scott - Quirky Travel Guytwitter: quirkytravelguy October 19, 2011 at

Great report, guys. I’ve missed out on a few of these in cities I’ve been visiting over the past week but fully support the movement.
Scott – Quirky Travel Guy recently posted: Checking out the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock

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Christy October 21, 2011 at

I’m sure there will be more to come if you’d like to participate, Scott – they don’t seem to be going away any time soon. :)

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Suzy October 23, 2011 at

It is interesting to see how quickly these occupy protests have spread across the globe. I do have trouble with the overall message of some of these protests. I know here in Denver, CO people are protesting so many different things from war to taxes that I’m not sure voices will be heard without a clear message being sent.

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Christy October 26, 2011 at

That’s a really interesting point, Suzy. Is it the message that you struggle with, or just that there are so many issues being protested that it’s hard to know what the heck is going on?

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Kelsey October 27, 2011 at

I am SO glad to see a travel blogger who is covering the #Occupy protests in this positive light. There has been a surprising amount of off-handed dismissal of the protests and it has really baffled me, especially since most travel bloggers are most definitely not in the 1%!

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Christy October 28, 2011 at

I definitely agree, Kelsey! I think a large part of the problem has been the media representation – the protests have really been criticized for things like not having a clear enough message, being run just by anarchists, having unreasonable demands, etc etc. Sure, there are some issues (and I definitely don’t want to sugarcoat anything), but it’s become easy to dismiss and a lot of the general public seems quite uninformed. At this point I’m not necessarily resting my hope in the OWS protests… but I just want to see something change, y’know? And I’m glad people are starting to become less complacent.

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Bob Donovan November 3, 2011 at

Great post. Great blog.
I’m not traveling per se, but we’re all on the journey. Planet earth — what’s our trajectory?

The mainstream media spins everything as do the spin doctors representing governments and corporate banks. The corporate banks have created nothing but fraud from their very inception — Money from nothing and Chick’s for free. A catchy riff, but its insulting and demeaning. A disregard for gender, race, and all species, including the living organism on which we live, the earth. Church and State — don’t get me started, but — the vatican just announced their approval (spin) of the 99%/wall street movement. The vatican proposes a rewriting of the “immoral” banking laws created by governments and central banks, and supports the creation of a new (and improved) central world bank over seen, get this — by NATO!

Banks based on rates of interest and money created from thin air is fraud—plain and simple. Try doing an audit on the vatican bank. You can’t. Why? One reason—it launders huge amounts of very dirty money. Take a peek into the organizations and families (1%) who backed the formation of NATO and the european union.

There are many alternative media sources. Try google-ing red ice radio, or red ice creations; david icke; or free banks. Some interviews are a bit far out, but they question the myopic view of the main stream media.

Happy travels:)

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Christy November 8, 2011 at

Hi Bob! I finally got a chance to check out some of your recommendations; very interesting. Fascinating that the Vatican came out in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement, though I can see how they’d spin it into supporting their own priorities. Of course everyone spins it their own way, but the Vatican is a unique case because of the amount of influence they have (in some areas), yet so little accountability.

For me that’s one of the main things I’d like to see more of (from governments and corporations and organizations like the Vatican) — accountability and transparency. Sadly there’s so little of either! It’s absolutely infuriating.

Anyhow, hope you’re doing well!

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